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, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealoin. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
on the same day the nation pauses to remember civil rights legend and icon dr. martin luther king jr.. two men, two very different dreams forever linked. it is monday january 21st inauguration day and good morning. thank you for joining fox 5 special coverage. i'm allison seymour. >> i'm tony perkins. we are broadcasting from our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy. it's a beautiful building and a beautiful view. we are blocks from where all the accident gets underway. we will bring it all to you live all morning long as we mentioned earlier. this is president obama's 4th oath of office. he took his third yesterday. we'll show you a little bit of that. >> chief justice john roberts administered the oath. the president has two swearing in ceremonies because inauguration day fell yesterday. he had two of the first time around because he and justice roberts flood their lines during the public ceremony. >> vice president joe biden was also sworn in yesterday morning just as he administered his oath at the naval observatory. >> today's oaths will take place just before the noon h
as our first african american president takes his second oath of office. we honor dr. martin luther king day, as well. president obama is a reflection of the accomplishments of this civil rights leader. there he is. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. some of the ones that push mutual funds with their names on them -- aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder -- isn't that a confl
on two bibles, president lincoln's and dr. martin luther king's, and this time, it was the president who seemed to swallow a word. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> reporter: and then, the president's address, just shy of 19 minutes, with a theme of moving forward together. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together. together. together. together. >> reporter: the first president ever to include gays in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce retu
to the late dr. martin luther king. a memorial to pay tribute to dr. king remains part of the landscape here in washington along the mall. next, a caller on the republican line. we will try one more time for it -- one more time. a quick look at the schedule tomorrow. our coverage will get underway at 7:00 a.m. eastern time, with the ceremonies taking place around washington. the president of travel in short distance to st. john's church for a prayer service carried we will coverag. he will head up pennsylvania avenue for the mile and a half trip from the white house to the u.s. capitol. the program getting underway shortly past 11:00 eastern time. the president will be sworn in for the ceremonial swearing-in at noon, that will be followed by lunch and inside the capitol. we will have coverage of the remarks led by senator chuck schumer, who is the chair of the inaugural congressional committee. the president will then depart the capital and head back to the white house. we will have the motorcade as it makes its way down pennsylvania avenue. the president likely to walk a very short distance
or to be doing in washington. the inauguration is on dr. martin luther king's birthday. >> the 21st of january. through four days prior on the 17th, we will be at george washington university for a live symposium on c-span and pbs and on public radio. we're talking specifically about how we get this president -- demanding, in fact, that he call a white house conference on the eradication of poverty. to his credit, the first thing he did four years ago when elector was on the lilly ledbetter. were demanding out what he called immediately on what has come for the on the eradication of poverty. let's craft a national plan to cut poverty and half in 10 years, to move toward eradicating it in 25 years. this is not a skill problem, it's a will problem. do we have the will to do this? if he wants to aim for the fences, if he wants to be a great american president, if he wants to leave behind a legacy -- and we read in the new york times from all his private talks with these his store and said that is what it wants to do, leave a legacy of the great transformational president -- we say take on the iss
as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me. and how i got involved in this journey of editing kinks papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you and i are of the same generation and i too was coming-of-age in the 60s. and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess week because they knew dr. came. he was my mentor and i knew in the last two years of my life in bitter because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i guess we can start at the beginning he caused at the beginning of your book you are run the mall with dr. came and ere the end of your book you are on the mall again 50 year
your life, and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write something for the anniversary and this is 50 years of my life and king's legacy and my life coincides with my coming of age, so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt that my life had been connected to the king legacy, and i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing team newspapers. >> host: its an excellent reading and you and buy your of the same generation, and why too was coming of age in the 60's. the book i might say was bittersweet to me because i knew dr. king, i knew him the last two years of his life and i am bitter because of the way that he was taken from us because of hatred in this country. i guess we can start at the beginning because the beginning of the but you were on the mall with dr. king and near the end you are near the mall again 50 years later with a monu
cho, guys, thanks so very much. that's the dr. martin luther king float going right past the reviewing stand right now. the float's design featuring an image of dr. king and a representation of his quote, out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope. martin luther king jr. float on this martin luther king day. appropriate, appropriate float. as we watch what's going on. there's the president. he's with some of the tuskegee airmen being honored right now. our own fredricka whitfield, by the way, her dad, a tuskegee airman. one of the heroes of world war ii. who went in, fought for all of us against the nazis in europe. did brilliantly, even though they got inferior equipment. they really managed to become heroes. they're being well recognized, as they should be. >> a very special moment, president obama spending time with them. i do notice, it does appear as if the first lady, as well as malia and sasha have gone back into the residence. they seem to have left the reviewing stand. so the president is there. you also see the vice president biden and his family all still there as well.
honorering dr. martin luther king president obama will take the oath again, make his inaugural address, and ride in the inaugural parade. four years ago an estimated 1.8 million people came to tin august rags. this year organizers expect less than half that number. >> the first inauguration was a path-breaking historic moment. expectations are much lowered for the second inaugural. >> reporter: but the president hopes to make his second term historic. his staff says he'll be far more aggressive as he takes on the republicans in the house over spending, gun control immigration, and tax reform. >> he's now got to be the guy in charge, the guy who inspires the american people, and who gets them behind his principles and his policies. >> reporter: but this weekend as he takes the oath on bibles which belonged to president lincoln and dr. king president obama wants to remind the nation of its traditions. >> the inauguration reminds us of the role that we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good. >> reporter: now today is a day of service in honor of dr. kin
of rhetoric. >> let me say this. this is the anniversary year of the march on washington, dr. martin luther king, who his holiday will be on monday when the president is inaugurated. in the famous speech he made, i have a dream, he referred to a governor whose lips drifts with the words of interposition and nullification. that is the words that we're hearing dripping from lips today. interposition and nullification. maybe when they said the president was trying to be a king, maybe they were talking about martin luther king. toure, david, thanks for your time tonight. and be sure to catch toure on "the cycle." >>> coming up, it's day 2 of the big gop unity retreat. a time for change. new blood. but why in the world are republicans asking paul ryan for advice on beating president obama? >>> and as the president surges in this second term, we have news tonight about the birther movement. and it might surprise you. >>> plus, 50 years since civil rights leader medgar evers was murdered. his legacy is living on through his wife. and i counted the civil rights movement. evers has a big moment at t
the country. but on the matter and, he didn't want to say i won't meet with dr. martin luther king partly because he shared the goal of cutting the voting rights bill. so with the work of was kind of an ego where they said dr. king was officially coming up to meet with the vice president, but they planned to have the president spontaneously call over there and say since you're here what don't you come over and talk to me? so there was a way of dancing around the ego and the political sensitivities on the race issue in this period. c-span: you also told a story about richard russell and lyndon johnson and the warren commission. >> guest: there were lots of those. i have one of the first photographs there as president johnson with his knows about this far away from richard russell, right after he becomes president, telling him you know, i love you. i don't know the exact quote, but you're like a father to me. but i want to give you warning i'm going to pass this civil rights bill. you are my dearest friend but i will run you down if i have to do it and i just wanted you to know that in adva
as a figure, dr. martin luther king jr. as he stands on the capital step for the swearing in, the president will not be standing alone. he will be surrounded by the women who helped make the man into a president. like president obama, so, too, was dr. king surrounded by women who helped make the man into a movement. women like ella baker. women like diane nash. women like fanny lou. koretta scott king. back with me, elizabeth alexander, myrlie evers. i hate the king memorial and at the same time love it. he emerged from a movement. what happens when we forget the other names? >> you know, he was a rock. >> hmm. >> his name still says that. regardless of whether we like the statue or not. i have a little criticism about the media. >> mm-hmm. >> the media decided that dr. king was the only person of importance in the movement. when they -- when he was killed, the media asked well who will your leader be? my question was why not embrace all the others that gave so much that did so much and include them in this? dr. king said, and i heard him say this on occasion, i am not in this alone. you ha
giving the annual reading of dr. martin luther king i have a dream speech from august of 1963 kuran washington fifth. now to the white house where the crews have been working on audience bleachers and the reviewing stand in front of the white house as the inaugural parade will walk down pennsylvania avenue this weekend actually this coming monday finishing touches including above the heated glass in box where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] preparation continue for the 57th presidential inauguration and sunday just before noon and will be the official swearing-in at the white house monday the public inaugural ceremony under way at the swearing in of the capitol and also the inaugural luncheon at the capitol and the afternoon parade will take your comments throughout the weekend on facebook and twitter and live coverage starts at 7 a.m. eastern on c-span radio and back now to the conference on disasters and the environment for a panel examining issues impacting the gulf
who want to privatize our schools are setting up academies. dr. martin luther king academy of leadership and enterprise. or they will name them for langston hughes, frederick douglass. i do not think a lot people should let them name the schools. [laughter] [applause] they should name it for people they do not like. [laughter] here are a few points. i will be unfashionable tonight. everyone in washington seems to think the way to solve the problems in our schools is to not give them another cent, another penny, to improve and make the schools look like places that are inviting and respect the value of children. aesthetics count. do not do that, but beat up on their teachers. that is the trend today. [applause] attack the unions. i heard about the teachers union from teachers in l.a. last fall. i flew to chicago to stand with them the day they went on strike. they were right to go on strike. [applause] i will tell you something. i am in schools all the time. when i was a young teacher, i remember this. schools are overwhelmingly -- the teachers are women. you go to a convent
also simultaneously have been the abortion president. dr. king, niece of the late dr. martin luther king, who had two abortions but is now solidly pro-life said in one of her speeches, and i quote her, my uncle matter-a dream. she said he dreamt that we would live out that which is self-evident, that all men are created equal. he called on america to turn from wrongs. today i call on all of us, dr. king says, regardless of nationality, race or religion to admit our wrongs and turn from them. i believe that the denial of the right to life is the greatest injustice we face in the world today. there is no compassion in killing, she sails. there is no justice in writing people out of the human race. history, mr. speaker, will not look favorably on today's abortion culture. we must indeed and instead work tirelessly to replace it with a culture of life. i would like to now yield to my good friend and colleague, macha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. -- marsha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman from ne
, the bible that dr. martin luther king carried with him during his travels and hosa parks' bible that she owned as a civil rights activist? >> rosa parks. >> yes. you're right. you're right. >> wow. congratulations. okay. so that's the one that won't be, but the other three will. >> he is using the in-laws' family bible in a small ceremony on monday. he is stacking the lincoln and martin luther king bibles. >> let's go back across to kath. we have kim kardashian with us, and it's her birthday from los angeles. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman. president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street no
academies. dr. martin luther king academy of leadership and enterprise. or they will name them for langston hughes, frederick douglass. should let the name the schools. [laughter] [applause] they should name it for people they do not like. [laughter] here are a few points. i will be unfashionable tonight. everyone in washington seems to think the way to solve the problems in our schools is to not give them another cent, another penny, to improve and make the schools look like places that are inviting and respect the value of children. aesthetics count. do not do that, but beat up on their teachers. that is the trend today. [applause] attack the unions. i heard about the teachers union from teachers in l.a. last fall. i flew to chicago to stand with them the day they went on strike. they were right to go on strike. [applause] i will tell you something. i am in schools all the time. when i was a young teacher, i remember this. schools are overwhelmingly -- the teachers are women. you go to a convention, if you are a guide, there are like 50 women for every guy. it is wonderful. i love it. [la
celebrate, and commemorate the legacy of martin luther king jr. dr. king would have us to do that. do what is right. what is fair, and what is just. he must lead this country and help lead the world for a more peaceful place. >> take us back 50 years, miss evers-williams. i think in a very bitterly divided congress people feel often -- look at the polls, people feel angry, hostile, and very divided about the direction that the country is going. so 50 years ago, was it worse? was it less divided? better? >> i think it was certainly divided. whether it was worse then, compared to now, i guess i would have to say yes, because so many lives were lost. and we know about that, and the challenges. but we still find little bits of that scattered throughout the country. >> what do you mean? >> well, my native state of mississippi, there have been killings there over the last year, that were certainly racial oriented. we can look at the hiring of jobs, we can look at people who wanted to vote and who had difficulty getting to the polls. what-not. it seems kind of changed. some of it remains the same
king and poverty before in 2011 when he spoke at the dedication of the martin luther king monument at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools and broken down slums, inadequate health care, constant violence, neighborhoods in which to many young people grow up with little hope and peace prospects for the future. >> president obama speaking in 2011 at the dedication of the martin luther king monument on the national mall in washington, d.c. journalist, a
section of history. martin luther king day. he invited me as president of the national action, presidents of the urban league and president of naacp, all these events and martin luther king's son. it was his way of recognizes dr. king's birthday and commitment to that agenda. we were at the church service and the agenda i don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his
luther king jr.'s bible i got upset. >> cenk: why did he get upset? we'll explain. and lupe fiasco. a wrapper we've had on the show. they were not happy with him either. he was thrown out of a party. for this. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> cenk: is he right? practice the partywere the partyers right? that's what we discuss on this show. that's exactly why it's go time. >> cenk: you know how these inauguration events go. there's a lot of talk about this is the moment. in fact, give me a moment here. oh there it is. there is the president and first lady walking down the street. now, this always makes me nervous. god bless them for walking down the street. at some point you got to get in the car. it makes everybody in the country nervous. it's great that they're walking along and great that there was a lot of security. now, of course there was some good moments in the speech. first as always president obama trying to hit that middle ground. >> we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority. nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through govern
assessment -- martin luther king, jr. [applause] so the president will clearly be in the foreground, but dr. king looms large as the backdrop. now, word comes from the white house that they will use his bible for this historic and iconic celebration, so we will talk tonight about how we honor the legacy of dr. king by focusing more attention on the issue that he gave his life for -- the poor. king once said we have to civilize ourselves by the immediate abolition of poverty. obviously, we are not quite there yet, but we of tonight's conversation will aid us and of that as in trying to make sure that we look out for the least among us. i am pleased tonight to be joined by an all-star panel. i want to introduce them one by one and jumped right into the conversation. i want to start by thanking c- span for carrying this program live around the world tonight. [applause] thank you, c-span. as the conversation gets under way, we will tell you more about what you can do at home or wherever you might be watching tonight to join in the conversation, but for now, let me introduce the novice panel of
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)